Ask an Agile Coach: What is an Agile Coach?

This installment of the Ask an Agile Coach series is a question normally asked by persons outside my field, but lately I have been asking it myself:

What is an Agile Coach?

Good question. I am not sure anymore.

The more I encounter others who call themselves Agile Coaches, the more I think I may not be up-to-date on what that is supposed to mean.

As I have historically interpreted it, an Agile Coach is someone who first actually established a proven track record of successfully leading a series of Agile adoptions as part of the actual teams. The insight, perspective, and expertise gained through that effort are what enable them to coach others. Multiple Agile teams in varied settings challenges what a person "knows to be true" and (hopefully) beats some humility into and the dogma out of them.

I have been under the impression that an Agile Coach also understands software development and the technical practices that support an Agile team. One must understand why testing, automation, code review, and pair programming exist. One must know what it feels like to work both with and without these things, know why professionals should adopt these practices, as well as when one or more of them are not a fit for the culture. It must be very strange to have management bring in a coach who tells you to do these things but cannot show you how.

I also thought that coaches should understand how to apply an Agile process in a way that stresses cross-functional participation. If what a coach is doing isn't helping the company to function more effectively as a whole, I fail to see the point. Agile Software Development is neither a defense mechanism for engineers nor a tool for more effective exploitation by management.

It feels weird to have to point this out, but I believe a coach should understand Agile estimation and planning techniques, especially the ones laid out in Mike Cohn's books. Estimating and planning are among the most painful parts of software development, and one of the most fulfilling parts of coaching for me has been mentoring groups in Agile estimating and planning.

I also think an Agile Coach is someone who can say no. Agile Software Development is a challenge at best, and a cultural nuke at worst. There are places where the introduction of Agile process and practices would wreak havoc. I suppose the toughest part of this is that it requires a willingness to turn down paying work.

I am seeing things these days that make me think my idea of what an Agile Coach is might be incorrect. If it is, I might need to stop using that word. It doesn't mean what I think it means.

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